Last edited by Shakara
Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

3 edition of Military reform in the viceroyalty of New Granada, 1773-1796. found in the catalog.

Military reform in the viceroyalty of New Granada, 1773-1796.

by Allan J. Kuethe

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  • 23 Currently reading

Published by University of Florida in [Gainesville] .
Written in

    Subjects:
  • New Granada (Viceroyalty) Ejércit,
  • Colombia -- History -- To 181,
  • Venezuela -- History -- To 181,
  • Ecuador -- History -- To 180

  • The Physical Object
    Paginationvi, 257 leaves
    Number of Pages257
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24137445M
    OCLC/WorldCa13140581

    The struggle for independence began in , and by Venezuela and Ecuador had seceded, and the remnant (Colombia and Panama) was renamed the Republic of New Granada. This became the Republic of Colombia in , from which the present Panama seceded in See A. J. Kuethe, Military Reform and Society in New Granada (). Meanwhile, military reform continued to progress. Miners' guilds with broad powers to promote production were installed in New Spain () and Peru (), and to improve mining practices, the crown sent technical missions to both of these viceroyalties and to New Granada .

    The New Kingdom of Granada (Spanish: Nuevo Reino de Granada) was the name given to a group of 16th-century Spanish colonial provinces in northern South America governed by the president of the Audiencia of Bogotá, an area corresponding mainly to modern-day conquistadors originally organized it as a captaincy general within the Viceroyalty of Peru. Introduction. In the s, the Spanish conquistador Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada coined the term “New Kingdom of Granada” to talk about the highlands of the northern Andes inhabited by native peoples he and his fellow explorers called the moscas—a term the conquerors adapted from the term these indigenous groups used for “people” or “humans,” but also because they .

      United Provinces Coat of Arms. image by Eugene Ipavec, 14 May Coat of Arms of United Provinces of New Granada, adopted on Novem (Law II and Law III). Source: page 54 of the book "Himnos y Símbolos de Nuestra Colombia", Camer Editores, published in , ISBN E.R., 14 May image by Eugene Ipavec, 14 May . In , he was a member of the Cabildo of the ayuntamiento in the capital of the Viceroyalty of New Spain. He was a prominent member of the Creole party in government. On J , along with Juan Francisco Azcárate y Ledesma presented a plan to form a provisional, autonomous government of New Spain, with the current viceroy, José de.


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Military reform in the viceroyalty of New Granada, 1773-1796 by Allan J. Kuethe Download PDF EPUB FB2

Military reform in the viceroyalty of New Granada, by Kuethe, Allan J., Pages: texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK (US) Genealogy Lincoln Collection.

National Emergency Library. Top Full text of "Military reform in the viceroyalty of New Granada, " See other formats. themilitaryreforminthe viceroyaltyofnewgranada, by allanjameskuethe adissertationpresentedtothegraduatecouncilof theuniversityofflorida.

the military reform in the viceroyalty of new granada, by allan james kuethe a dissertation presented to the graduate council of the university of florida in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the decree of ductor of philosophy university of florida august, The process of reform of Spanish America’s armed forces went hand in hand with the process of appointment of “professional” military officers to government posts.

7 The process of creation of the viceroyalty of New Granada offers further evidence that this trend, often associated with the latter Bourbons, had begun much earlier, if perhaps timidly, under Alberoni with the designation of Jorge de Villalonga as viceroy of New Granada.

The Viceroyalty of New Granada (Spanish: Virreinato de Nueva Granada [birejˈnato ðe ˈnweβa ɣɾaˈnaða]) was the name given on 27 Mayto the jurisdiction of the Spanish Empire in northern South America, corresponding to modern Colombia, Ecuador, and territory corresponding to Panama was incorporated later inand the provinces of.

Francisco A. Eissa-Barroso’s The Spanish Monarchy and the Creation of the Viceroyalty of New Granada () argues that the pace and character of the most salient Bourbon reform introduced in Spanish America in the early eighteenth century were determined by relations between New Granadan elites and authorities in Spain, reflected changes in European.

A.J. Kuethe, Military reform in the viceroyalty of New Granada, IA L.R. Grahn, Indian Pacification in the Viceroyalty of New Granada,thesis Texas Tech Economy & Finances. Viceroyalty of New Granada, in colonial Latin America, a Spanish viceroyalty that was first established insuppressed inand reestablished in It included present-day Colombia, Panama (after ), Ecuador, and Venezuela and had its capital at Santa Fe (present-day Bogota).

* List of Viceroys of New Granada. Notes. Bibliography *Fisher, John R., Allan J. Keuthe and Anthony McFarlane, eds. "Reform and Insurection in Bourbon New Granada and Peru". Baton Rouge, Louisiana State University Press, ISBN *Kuethe, Alan J.

"Military Reform and Society in New Granada, ". The New Kingdom of Granada (Spanish: Nuevo Reino de Granada), or Kingdom of the New Granada, was the name given to a group of 16th-century Spanish colonial provinces in northern South America governed by the president of the Audiencia of Santa Fe, an area corresponding mainly to modern-day conquistadors originally organized it as a captaincy general within the Viceroyalty.

Most reforms came in a bundle in the late 18th century, the creation in of the Viceroyalty of New Granada based in Santa Fé (Bogotá) being an exception. A major Bourbon reform, taking place mainly in the s, was the creation of large districts called intendancies (the word and model were French).

New Granada, Viceroyalty of. Viceroyalty of New Granada. Following a failed start (–), the Viceroyalty of New Granada, with its capital in Santa Fe de Bogotá, was reestablished in both to convert northern South America into an economic asset for Spain and to strengthen its military posture in the face of imminent war.

Viceroy Sebastián de. The monarchy also turned to experienced military officers as executives, curtailing the influence of men trained in law. The author uses the creation of the Viceroyalty of New Granada (today's Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela), its initial brief existence (), and its reestablishment in as a case study of politics both at court and within the.

Get this from a library. Military reform and society in New Granada, [Allan J Kuethe]. The reforms attempted in New Spain were implemented elsewhere in Spanish America subsequently. There had been one earlier reform in the creation of the new Viceroyalty of New Granada (), carved out from the Viceroyalty of Peru to improve the administration of the overseas possessions.

The new viceroyalty was created initially in 4 Allan James Kuethe, " The Military Reform in the Viceroyalty of New Granada, " (Ph.D. dissertation, University of Florida, ), chapter 1. 5 Ibid. 6 A valuable description of the Guajiros and their domain can be found in.

Book Description: In The Spanish Monarchy and the Creation of the Viceroyalty of New Granada (), Francisco A. Eissa-Barroso analyzes the politics behind the most salient Bourbon reform introduced in Spanish America during the early eighteenth century. The New Kingdom of Granada (Spanish: Nuevo Reino de Granada) was the name given to a group of 16th century Spanish colonial provinces in northern South America governed by the Audiencia of Bogotá, an area corresponding mainly to modern Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador and ally part of the Viceroyalty of Peru, it became part of the Viceroyalty of New Granada.

The Viceroyalty of New Granada (Spanish: Virreinato de la Nueva Granada) was the name given on 27 Mayto the jurisdiction of the Spanish Empire in northern South America, corresponding to modern Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, and Venezuela.

The territory corresponding to Panama was incorporated later inand the provinces of Venezuela were separated from the Viceroyalty. Some causes were long-standing, related to the viceroyalty in New Granada in There is a debate among historians over what the main factor was that contributed to the start of the rebellion ofbut what is clear is the fact that the need for economic and political reform and the idea of self-government were all contributors.The Revolt of the Comuneros was an uprising by the inhabitants of the Viceroyalty of New Granada (now Colombia and parts of Venezuela) against the Spanish authorities in While underlying causes may have been economic, ideas of freedom and self-government were expressed.

These uprisings preceded the fight for independence against Spanish rule that .The Viceroyalty of New Granada was the name given on 27 Mayto the jurisdiction of the Spanish Empire in northern South America, corresponding to modern Colombia, Ecuador, and Venezuela.

The territory corresponding to Panama was incorporated later inand the provinces of Venezuela were separated from the Viceroyalty and assigned to the Captaincy .